The Story Daily Bible Reading Challenge

Final NT miracles

The last recorded miracles of the New Testament are in Acts 28. Paul’s voyage to Rome ended with a shipwreck on the island of Malta, a small island just south of Sicily. Once there we see two miracles. Paul is bitten by a viper and shakes the snake off into the fire, but is just fine. Obviously someone might say that the particular snake wasn’t venomous, but either way Jesus saw to it that his servant wasn’t adversely affected. But the second miracle involves the...

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Eutychus raised to life

The account of Eutychus falling out a window and dying, then being brought back to life is fascinating. Acts 20 records that Paul, Silas, Timothy and Luke (notice the “we”) were in Troas. Paul talked until midnight and the lamps in the room made it warm….and Eutychus, probably a teenager, fell asleep sitting in the window. He falls asleep and falls to his death, but Jesus brings him to life through Paul. So is this account a lesson for us about not paying attention to...

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More miracles -- Paul's second missionary journey

In Acts 16:16 we see miracles both through the Apostle Paul and for the Apostle Paul’s benefit. Paul and Silas were in Philippi on their second missionary journey when they encounter a girl who predicted the future. The Bible makes it clear that this was a miracle from Satan – not from God. Note that the devil has power to do miracles. He’s constantly mimicking God, even doing miracles at times. But to confirm the message of Jesus being the world’s only Savior, God...

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Miracles on Paul's first missionary journey

In Acts 14:3 we see a fulfillment of Jesus’ prediction in Mark 16:17-20. As the good news of forgiveness went to people around the Mediterranean world, it was confirmed by miraculous signs – miracles. In Iconium Paul and Barnabas both were able to do miracles. Then in Lystra (see Acts 14:8-10) Paul heals a man who was unable to walk. But then the chaos started. In their native language they were yelling that the gods have come down in human form. At some point Paul and Barnabas...

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Prison break number 2

This might sound like last week’s miracle in Acts 5, but in Acts 12 we see another prison break by a miraculous intervention of an angel. This one in Acts 12 is about ten years after Acts 5. It’s about 43 AD;  Claudius is the Roman emperor (he ruled from 41-54 AD);  the “King Herod” is Agrippa I, the grandson of Herod the Great (the Bethlehem baby killer) and nephew of Herod Antipas (who killed John the Baptist).  Agrippa killed James the brother of John...

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First of three prison breaks

In Acts 5 we see the first of several miraculous prison escapes (see Acts 12 and 16 for the other two). Here in Acts 5 it’s still very soon after Pentecost, the church in Jerusalem is growing and the Jewish leaders (especially the Sanhedrin) are doing what they can to get rid of this growing group that insists Jesus of Nazareth was, in fact, the promised Messiah. Starting in Acts 5:18, Luke tells us that they “arrested the apostles and put them in the public jail.” ...

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The first post-Ascension miracle

This week’s miracle is Peter healing the paralyzed man at the temple. It’s in Acts chapter 3 and this is a short time after Pentecost (which was ten days after Jesus’ ascension). So Jesus had sent the Holy Spirit to his apostles, and they were now boldly testifying to the truth that Jesus was, in fact, the Messiah. The church grew rapidly and God allowed the apostles to do miracles. The question usually comes up about if Jesus still gives that gift to his church today. It...

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Another repeat miracle

This week our reading takes us to a post-resurrection miracle, the second great catch of fish in John 21.  With an almost identical miracle from three years earlier, Jesus again proves he’s God and shows the disciples that  he will provide the “fish” as they go out to fish for people. Have you ever considered that people, like fish, are useful only when they are caught? Once the Holy Spirit “catches” us, then we’re useful for his...

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John's account - Part 4

The final of the Easter readings is from the Gospel of John.  Realize that John wrote his book about 40 years after Matthew, Mark & Luke were written so he includes supplementary things that the other three didn’t include. In John 20 he includes the details about him and John running to the tomb (John must have been the youngest disciple and clearly a faster runner);  he includes the strips of cloth just lying there in the cave and the burial cloth that covered the face...

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Jesus' resurrection - part 3

Today’s Easter reading is from Luke 24. Luke has a couple unique details:  he tells us there were actually two angels;   he records the angels’ words reminding the women that Jesus had precisely predicted the resurrection;  he is only evangelist to mention Joanna (the wife of Cuza);  and then he refers to Peter going to the tomb, which John will expand on in tomorrow’s reading. Luke is the one who emphasized that Jesus is the universal Savior of...

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